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ceramitec conference program

From raw materials to process technology to industrial applications in the automotive, aerospace, electrical, dental and medical engineering industries – the ceramitec conference will highlight the latest trends of the ceramics industry and a multitude of application possibilities. Enjoy two days of compact know-how transfer – and seize the opportunity to intensively network with well-known industry leaders.

Day 1 ceramitec conference: September 15, 2021

8:30 - 9:00 Welcome Coffee
8:30 - 9:00 9:00 - 10:30 Welcome Coffee Words of Welcome

Task Force Hydrogen: Hydrogen for and with Ceramics – a Common Initiative of the Federal Association of the German Ceramics Industry (BVKI) and the German Ceramic Society (DKG)
Prof. Dr Alexander Michaelis, Institute Director, Fraunhofer IKTS

Moderation
Karin Scharrer, Editor-in-Chief, CERAMIC APPLICATIONS, Göller Verlag
8:30 - 9:00 10:30 - 11:00 Welcome Coffee - Break -
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Forum 1: New Horizons for Additive Manufacturing of Ceramics

Organizer:
Moderator:
CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Karin Scharrer, Editor-in-Chief, CERAMIC APPLICATIONS, Göller Verlag
[#text: ] 11:00 - 12:30 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Scene Additive – Together to a Productive Level of Ceramic Additive Manufacturing
Dr. Tassilo Moritz, Task Force Additive Manufacturing DKG; Gruppenleiter Fraunhofer IKTS, Germany

New Materials/Additives for Enhanced Performance of AM-Technologies

Plant-based Hydrocolloids and Biopolymers – Bio-based Solutions for Ceramic AM?
Sascha Galic, Senior Produktmanager, J. Rettenmaier & Söhne, Germany

Ceramics and Metal AM by FFF Process and Use-cases
Elisabeth To, Ingénieur technico-commercial, NanoE, France
[#text: ] 12:30 - 13:30 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
- Break -
[#text: ] 13:30 - 15:30 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
New Technologies for the Manufacture of AM-Parts

3D Printing of Ceramic Structures via Material Jetting
Alexander Kremer, TechCenter Additive Fertigung, Rauschert Heinersdorf-Pressig, Germany

AM by Extrusion of Ceramics
Torsten Seidel, Technischer Geschäftsführer, ECT-KEMA GmbH, Germany

Ceramic Additive Manufacturing for New Space
Richard Gaignon, CEO, 3DCERAM, France

Making Binder Jetting Really Work for Technical Ceramics
Boris Agea-Blanco, Development Engineer, CerAMing, Germany
[#text: ] 15:30 - 16:00 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
- Break -
[#text: ] 16:00 - 17:30 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Ceramic Components Made by AM – the Economic Alternative?

CerAMfacturing of Ceramic-based Multi Material Components
Dr. Uwe Scheithauer, Researcher, Fraunhofer IKTS, Germany

New Approaches of AM of Dense and Porous Ceramics for Advanced Refractory Applications
Dr. Patrick Gehre, Scientist, Institute of Ceramics, Refractories and Composite Materials, TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany

3D Screen Printing of Solar Absorbers Made of SiSiC, Sintered in an Efficient High-performance Furnace
René Kirchner, Head of Sales, FCT Systeme GmbH, Germany; Daniel Bienenstein, Project Manager, Extensis Group AG, Switzerland

Breakeven Point for Ceramic AM is Now a Lot More Attractive
Dror Danai, Chief Business Officer, XJET, Israel

Closing Words
[#text: ] 18:00 - 22:00 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Networking Night

Forum 2: High-Temperature Technologies

Organizer:
Moderator:
HT-Technology/Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL
Prof. Dr. Friedrich Raether, Leiter, Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL
[#text: ] 11:00 - 12:30 HT-Technology/Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL
Thermoprocessing Equipment

Application of Electric Current Assisted Sintering Techniques for Advanced Processing of Energy Materials
Dr. Martin Bram, Habilitated PrivateLecturer, Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany

Clean and green – opportunities and challenges for industrial kiln construction in a post-Covid era
Andreas Hajduk, Sales Manager, Riedhammer GmbH, Germany

Debinding and Sintering under Advanced Atmospheres
Heinz-Jürgen Blüm, Managing Director, MUT Advanced Heating GmbH, Germany

Using Hydrogen in Ceramic Industry Kilns – H2 Hybrid Kilns Gaining Ground?
Hartmut Weber, Vice President Sales, CREMER Thermoprozessanlagen GmbH, Germany

Concept and Benefits of Digital Furnace Twins
Dr. Gerhard Seifert, Senior Researcher, Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL, Germany
[#text: ] 12:30 - 13:30 HT-Technology/Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL
- Break -
[#text: ] 13:30 - 15:30 HT-Technology/Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL
High Temperature Materials

Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites - Replacement Possibility for Metallic Alloys at High Temperatures
Walter Pritzkow,Managing Director, Keramikblech, Germany

New Refractory Materials and Concepts for the Reduction of CO2 Emissions of High-Temperature Processes
Dr. Rainer Gaebel, Managing Director, Refratechnik Holding GmbH, Germany

Reaction Bonding of Mullite-based Ceramics
Rabea Naemi Cegla, Researcher,Steuler KCH/DE, Germany

Ceramic Coatings for High-temperature Applications
Jonathan Maier, Scientist, Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL, Germany
[#text: ] 15:30 - 16:00 HT-Technology/Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL
- Break -
[#text: ] 16:00 - 17:30 HT-Technology/Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL
Process Development

The Challenge of Drying Technical Ceramics
Markus Lindner, Konstruktionsleiter, Lippert GmbH & Co KG, Germany

Upscaling Processes for Advanced Ceramics from Laboratory into Industrial Production
Axel Weiand, Vice President, Onejoon GmbH, Germany

EnerViT - Energy-efficient Kiln Plants Between Present and Future
Thomas Alten, Managing Director, Keramischer OFENBAU GmbH, Germany

Debinding and Sintering Optimization via Apps
Dr. Holger Friedrich, Senior Scientist, Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL, Germany

Energy Efficiency in Practice
Frank Veitengruber, Project Manager, Forschungsgesellschaft für Energiewirtschaft mbH, Germany
[#text: ] 18:00 - 22:00 HT-Technology/Fraunhofer-Zentrum für Hochtemperatur-Leichtbau HTL
Networking Night

Forum 3: AM Ceramics—MAKING INNOVATION HAPPEN

Organizer:
Moderator:
Lithoz
Dr. Andraž Kocjan, Jožef Stefan Institute, Slowenia
[#text: ] 11:00 - 12:30 Lithoz
Market insights and innovation strategies

Market potential for technical ceramics additive manufacturing part production
Mr. Davide Sher, 3D pbm

Patents in AM and why they matter
Judy Ceulemans, European Patent Office, tbc

Don’t sit and wait but innovate
Prof. Roland Ortt, TU Delft
[#text: ] 12:30 - 13:30 Lithoz
- Break -
[#text: ] 13:30 - 15:30 Lithoz
Industrial Applications and Production

Additive Manufacturing of Novel Piezocomposite Structures
Barry Robinson, Ceramics Manufacturing Manager
MSI Transducers Corporation, USA

The disruptive impact AM technical Ceramics - Product development development lifecycle of next generation medical devices.
Mr. John O'Rourke, Boston Scientific Ireland Clonme

Powder bed 3D printing for the production of reaction-bonded silicon carbide
Dr. Minas-Payamyar, Schunk Ingenieurstechnik

3D Printing of Ceramics: Binder Jetting vs. Material Extrusion
Dr. Wolfgang Kollenberg, WZR
[#text: ] 15:30 - 16:00 Lithoz
- Break -
[#text: ] 16:00 - 17:30 Lithoz
Industrial Applications and Production

Manufacturing and Testing of a 500,000 rpm Rotor for Micro Turbine Applications”
Technion Israel Institue of Technology, Mr. Lukas Badum

Lithoz CeraFab 8500 at Sandia National Laboratories – a year in review
Dale Cillessen, Sandia National Laboratories

Additive Manufacturing at JPL: Research and Applications
NASA, Samad Firdosi
[#text: ] 18:00 - 22:00 Lithoz
Networking Night

Day 2 ceramitec conference: September 16, 2021

Forum 1: Progress of Industry 4.0 Concepts in the Ceramic Industry

Organizer:
Moderator:
CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Karin Scharrer, Editor-in-Chief, CERAMIC APPLICATIONS, Göller Verlag
[#text: ] 09:00 - 09:30 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Datamanagement in Production of Ceramic Membranes
Christian Göbbert. Chief Research & Science Officer, Nanostone Water, Halberstadt, D
[#text: ] 09:30 - 10:00 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Transformation from Manufactory to Smart Production
Wolfgang Heining,Project Manager, Lippert GmbH & Co. KG, Pressath, D

Data-centric Smart Factory
Matteo Tellarini, Data Scientist, SACMI Innovation Lab, Imola, IT
[#text: ] 10:00 - 10:30 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Redefining Interactions with Machinery and Equipment! Un-lock AR Empowered Processes in the Ceramics Industry
Daniel Mirbach, Leiter Marketing, oculavis GmbH, Aachen, D
[#text: ] 10:30 - 11:00 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
- Break -
[#text: ] 11:00 - 12:00 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
The Next Challenge in Digital Production with Powder Metal Presses
Herbert Gröbl, Leiter der Informationstechnologie, Dorst Technologies GmbH & Co. KG; Murnau, D

Panel Discussion (all speakers of this session)
[#text: ] 12:00 - 13:30 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
- Lunch-Break -
[#text: ] 13:30 - 14:00 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Ceramic Components for Enhanced System Solutions

Umwelt-und Processtechnik/Elektronik

Silicon Nitride Speciality Materials for Product and Process Innovation in Semi-conductor and Analysis Technology

Dr. Ulrich Degenhardt, Leiter Forschung und Entwicklung, FCT Ingenieurkeramik GmbH, Rödental,Germany
[#text: ] 14:00 - 14:30 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Ceramic Filters for Advanced Process Technologies
Martin Simon, Head of design and project manager, ECT-KEMA GmbH, Germany

Tailoring Natural Fertilizer
Raphael Kunz, Vertriebsingenieur keramische Filter, KERAFOL Keramische Folien GmbH & Co. KG, Eschenbach, D
[#text: ] 14:30 - 15:00 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
- Break -
[#text: ] 15:00 - 16:00 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
NEXTREMA® Glass-Ceramic Solutions: Game-Changer for Industrial Applications
Stephanie Schwarz, Leiterin Vertrieb und Marketing Schott ROBAX® & NEXTREMA®, SCHOTT AG, Mainz, D

Silicon Carbide Material: Solutions for Laser Processes, Semiconductor, Opto-mechanics OEMS and Chemical Industries
Marc Ferrato, Manager R+D, Mersen Boostec, France
[#text: ] 14:00 - 14:30 CERAMIC APPLICATIONS / AM
Medical

Consequences of Stretching Ceramic Mechanical Properties to their Limits for Technologically Challenging Applications
Senad Hasanovic, VicePresident Innovation & Development, Ceramaret SA, Bôle, CH

Advanced Ceramics for Healthcare – Materials, Properties, Applications
Ulrich Werr, Area Sales Manager, Rauschert Heinersdorf-Pressig GmbH, Pressig, Germany

Highly Leak-tight Ceramic-metal Assembly for a Novel, Three-dimensional Imaging X-ray Process
Dr Kai Sauerzapfe, Head of Business Unit Battery Systems, Alumina Systems/DE

Forum 2: CERAMIC INJECTION MOULDING

Organizer:
Moderator:
Expert Group CIM
Dr. Moritz von Witzleben, Geschäftsführer, INMATEC Technologies GmbH, Rheinbach, D
[#text: ] 09:00 - 10:00 Expert Group CIM
Technology with Excellent Growth Potential:

Panel Discussion with the following participants:

Dr. Karin Hajek, Sales Director, INMATEC Technologies GmbH, Rheinbach,
Hartmut Walcher, Manager PIM Laboratory, Arburg GmbH + Co KG, Loßburg/DE
Harrie Sneijers, Sales Director, Formatec Technical Ceramics, Goirle/NL
Jens Graf, Leiter Marketing & Vertrieb, Kläger Spritzguss GmbH & Co. KG, Karlsruhe/DE
Phillip Ninz, Scientist, Institut für Fertigungstechnologie keramischer Bauteile, Universität Stuttgart/DE
Uwe Schnitzler, R+D Engineer,ERBE Elektromedizin GmbH, Stuttgart/DE
[#text: ] 10:00 - 10:30 Expert Group CIM
- Break -
[#text: ] 10:30 - 11:30 Expert Group CIM
Additive Manufacturing of Metals
Organizer: Institut für Anwendungstechnik, Pulvermetallurgie und Keramik an der RWTH Aachen

Moderator & Keynote
Accelerating the LPBF Process by the Combination of AM and HIP
Dr. Anke Kaletsch, Abteilungsleiterin Pulvertechnologie, Institut für Anwendungstechnik, Pulvermetallurgie und Keramik an der RWTH Aachen, Aachen, D

Efficient Production and Qualification of New Materials for the LPBF Process
Daniel Beckers, Leiter Metallpulverproduktion / F&E, Rosswag engineering, Pfinztal, DE
[#text: ] 11:30 - 13:00 Expert Group CIM
- Lunch-Break -
[#text: ] 13:00 - 14:00 Expert Group CIM
Lithography-based Metal Manufacturing (LMM)
Dr. Gerald Mitteramskogler, Chief Executive Officer, Incus GmbH, Wien, A

AM/HIP
Marc Knauff, Managing Director, Cremer HIP Innovations/DE
[#text: ] 14:00 - 14:30 Expert Group CIM
- Break -
[#text: ] 14:30 - 16:30 Expert Group CIM
Hard Metals - Innovation Trends

100 years of hard metal and still not at the end
Dr. Jürgen Schmidt, Extramet AG, Plaffeien/CH
Dr. Margarethe Traxler, R&D Group Leader Material Development, Boehlerit GmbH & Co. KG, Kapfenberg/AT

Current Trends in the Development of Hard Metals
Dr Johannes Pötschke, Group Leader Hardmetals and Cermet, Fraunhofer IKTS

Additive Manufacturing of WC-Co Hard Metals Using Laser Powder Bed Fusion
Sofia Fries, Senior Scientist, Gruppenleiterin Hartmetall und Cermets, IWM an der RWTH Aachen, Aachen, D

The potential of innovative furnace technology for the development of hardmetal products for specific applications
Dr. Jaqueline Gruber, Executive Assistant, Cremer Thermoprozessanlagen GmbH, Düren, Germany

Forum 3: AM Ceramics—MAKING INNOVATION HAPPEN

Organizer:
Moderator:
Lithoz
Dr. Andraž Kocjan, Jožef Stefan Institute, Slowenia
[#text: ] 09:00 - 10:00 Lithoz
Dental applications and implants

Applications and ongoing research of ceramic additive manufacturing in medicine
Dr. Francesco Moscato, Medical University of Vienna

Ceramic dental implants - 3D-printed applications
Dr. Jens Tartsch, European Society for Ceramic Implantology

3D-printed zirconia for dental restorations: perspectives and requirements
Priv.-Doz. Dr. Sebastian Schwindling, Universität Heidelberg

Bone regeneration with 3D printed biodegradable ceramic scaffold
Prof. Dr. Annelie-Martina Weinberg, Medical University of Graz
[#text: ] 10:00 - 10:30 Lithoz
- Break -
[#text: ] 10:30 - 12:00 Lithoz
Multi material 3D printing

New possibilities through multi-material printing in ceramics
Mr. Sebastian Geier, Lithoz GmbH

Exploring new concepts to design damage tolerant ceramics using additive manufacturing
Prof. Raul Bermejo, Montanuniversität Leoben

"Additive manufacturing of alumina ceramics for the selective laser induced metallization"
Mr. Philip Ninz, IFBK, Universität Stuttgart
[#text: ] 12:00 - 13:30 Lithoz
- Lunch-Break -
[#text: ] 13:30 - 15:30 Lithoz
New Applications
Characterisation of the components as a function of the orientation in the installation space.
Dr. Uwe Scheithauer, Fraunhofer IKTS

Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Porous Structures for Application to Combustion Systems
Dr. Sadaf Sobhani, Cornell University, NY

Additive Manufacturing – activities and success stories from the ceramic industry
Astrid Lang, Projektmanagerin Technologie Werkstoffe, Bayern Innovativ GmbH, Nürnberg

Uncovering the "hows" and the "whys" of colloidal stability in ceramic resins for stereolithohgraphy
Wadih Yared, M. Sc., Institute for Manufacturing Technologies of Ceramic Components and Composites - IMTCCC, University of Stuttgart
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Alexander Kremer
Rauschert Heinersdorf-Pressig GmbH
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Rauschert Heinersdorf-Pressig GmbH

Alexander Kremer

3D Printing of Ceramic Structures via Material Jetting

Since licensing the patented additive manufacturing process “direct inkjet printing“ in 2020 Rauschert Heinersdorf-Pressig GmbH pushes its development towards industri-alization. Direct inkjet printing is a material jetting process that is characterized by a direct deposition of aqueous ceramic suspensions onto a substrate via inkjet print-heads. After deposition, each printed layer is dried in a controlled manner, resulting in high packing densities of the sub-micron particles. This leads to sintered parts with theoretical densities of up to 99,9 %. Furthermore, by simply using multiple printheads simultaneously, the drop-wise deposition of material allows for an easy manufacturing of multi-material parts with a high freedom of design analogous to colour transitions in graphic printing.

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Dr. Andraž Kocjan
Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
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Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia

Dr. Andraž Kocjan

Andraž Kocjan has graduated in 2005 from Chemical Engineering at the Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. He obtained his PhD in Nanosciences and nanotechnologies at the Jožef Stefan International Postgraduate School (IPS) in 2010 when working at Jožef Stefan Institute (JSI) as a young researcher. In 2011 he moved to the Stockholm University`s Division of Materials and Environmental Chemistry for 1.5 year working as a guest, postdoctoral researcher, where he successfully executed a JECS Trust Frontiers of Research project. Afterwards, he gained a permanent position at JSI and habilitation at IPS, where he is an Assistant Professor. In 2015, he became head of the research programme Engineering and Bioceramics funded by the Slovenian Research Agency. Today dr. Kocjan is a senior scientific associate at the JSI`s Department for Nanostructured Materials. His main research focus is on developing ceramic materials with novel or improved functions for advanced engineering and biomedical applications though exploring the potentials of advanced processing techniques.

In 2019 he received a Young Scientist award of the European Ceramic Society (ECERS). He was a member of established committee of the Young Ceramists Network and is today's chairperson of the ECERS` Young Ceramists and Training Working Group. He is also a deputy of Ceramics section of the Slovenian Chemical Society. Up to date, Dr. Kocjan has EU and Slovenian patent, GB patent application, technical invention, has published 54 scientific papers (~1200 pure citations, h-index: 16), 2 professional papers and 3 non-technical articles and held 8 invited talks and 7 interviews. He has co-founded a spin-out company based on JSI`s licensed knowledge.

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Andreas Hajduk
Sales Manager
Technical Ceramics, Riedhammer GmbH/DE
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Sales Manager
Technical Ceramics, Riedhammer GmbH/DE

Andreas Hajduk

Clean and Green—Opportunities and Challenges for Industrial Kiln Construction in a Post-COVID Era

Despite Covid-related restrictions, Riedhammer—together with the SACMI Group—has a far-reaching organization that is fully capable of meeting customer needs, all thanks to decentralized supply chains, flexible production, virtual maintenance tools and a skilled international workforce.

For the calcination of Li-ion-battery powder, a single contract can contain 20 or more production lines. Such high-volume orders require extensive experience, pre-engineering and testing. Detailed designs need to be in place at the time of project negotiation.

Customers are looking to replace fossil fuels with cleaner energy sources. At the same time, standards are becoming ever-stricter and thermal processes more complex. In response, we already offer multiple sustainable heating concepts.
One example of Riedhammer kiln technology—developed for the needs of tomorrow—is the ELK (Extra Large Kiln), designed to meet demand for ultra-high production ca-pacity in the Li-ion-battery sector. One ELK provides the throughput of 4 to 8 modern RHKs (Roller Hearth Kilns) while matching or even surpassing RHK performance parameters.

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Axel Weiand
Vice President Sales New Business
Onejoon GmbH/DE
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Vice President Sales New Business
Onejoon GmbH/DE

Axel Weiand

Upscaling Processes for Advanced Ceramics from Laboratory into Industrial Production

There is a high focus on the development of advanced materials and ceramics for new applications and industries, e. g. oxide and non-oxide powders for battery applications, SOFC and other multi-layer ceramics as well as high performance electronics. Where new materials and products have been successfully approved on a lab scale, the challenge is to define the next steps towards a product validation and the realization of volume production. Where material performance is a key driving force in the development phase of a new product, for a large-scale production this is not enough. Production cost, sustainability and reproducibility are equally important as investment cost for equipment.

The lecture will give an insight of how this process can be accelerated in close cooperation between furnace supplier and ceramic producer. Key success factor for this undertaking is a good understanding of the possibilities and challenges when realizing new and complex processes with high volumes. It is an essential part of the development process to generate a vision for a volume production system in order to gradually work towards that vision through a series of well-defined steps.
Typical steps during this process include test firings in pilot scale kilns and furnaces, using near to production scale carriers or saggars. They sometimes contain the realization of pilot scale kilns and small volume kilns, aimed to allow the validation of the process under “near to” production conditions. Final step is the ramp up scenario for the production. During this last phase, production efficiency is almost as important for the success of a new product.

Examples will be presented how the two important requirements can be combined based on an analytical and innovative route towards an efficient production concept. Using a wide range of test facilities and the profound engineering excellence of Onejoon, as well as supporting CFD and FEM Simulations.

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Thomas Alten
Managing Director
Keramischer OFENBAU GmbH/DE
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Managing Director
Keramischer OFENBAU GmbH/DE

Thomas Alten

EnerViT—Energy-Efficient Kiln Plants between Present and Future

There are worldwide efforts to implement alternative, clean solutions for reducing global warming and enabling zero-emission processes CO2 output. Overall change from fossil fuels, such as natural gas or LPG to alternatives such as hydrogen, Syngas and electric energy and building up the corresponding capacities and supply chains worldwide may take up to 10 years. With EnerViT plus, Keramischer OFENBAU offers an energy-efficient bridging technology for today’s kiln plants. Besides the equipment of new continuous kilns with this highly efficient heating system, a big advantage is the conversion / retrofitting of existing kilns by implementing the EnerViT firing technology. Significant reduction in specific energy consumption and CO2-emission were shown in many successful kiln conversions all over the world.
Thus, while using existing plants, it is possible to achieve high energy savings and reduction of carbon footprint TODAY.

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Boris Agea-Blanco
CerAMing, Berlin/DE
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CerAMing, Berlin/DE

Boris Agea-Blanco

Making Binder Jetting Really Work for Technical Ceramics

As an alternative shaping method to the traditionally used processes, additive manufacturing (AM) can produce economical ceramic components in small lot sizes and/or with complex geometries. Powder-based additive manufacturing processes like binder jetting are popular in the field of metal AM. One reason is the increased productivity compared to other AM technologies. For ceramic materials, powder-based AM technologies result in porous ceramic parts, provided they are not infiltrated. CerAMing GmbH unites the advantages of powder-based processes with the production of dense ceramics by means of the layerwise slurry deposition.  By using a slurry, a high packing density of the powder bed is achieved which leads to high green body densities. Furthermore, a very economical debinding time allows the production of parts with high wall thicknesses. The advantages of the technology will be discussed in detail.”

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Christian Goebbert
Managing Director
Nanostone Water GmbH, Halberstadt/DE
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Managing Director
Nanostone Water GmbH, Halberstadt/DE

Christian Goebbert

Data management in Production of Ceramic Membranes

The industrial production of ceramic filters has a history which goes way back into the 40s of the last century. This industrialization was triggered by the need for the enrichment of Uranium 235 used in the first atomic bombs and a technology capable to realize that. Although today, the use of ceramic membranes is solely focused on more peaceful applications like in the chemical industry, the major production processes are still handled in a similar and very often manually manner. As ceramic membranes were mostly used in niche market applications and thus manageable production capacities, the well-defined & monitored manual processes could easily handle the collected data and its management so far. In recent years that changed dramatically due to the larger demands for ceramic membranes in broader mass-market applications like waste water and drinking water treatment. As automation became a crucial part of the former manually driven production processes, data creation, collection, analysis, and its management were paramount to run the new production lines economically sound and safe. Although the production processes are well-known and understood and each individual process on its own is rather more simple than complex, the combination of all of them and their interaction to each other, especially on a significant larger production scale, had a major impact to the process control and the data management. This presentation will give an overview of the unexpected but not unsolvable challenges and how potential solutions may look like.

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Daniel Beckers
Head Metal Powder Production
Rosswag engineering
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Head Metal Powder Production
Rosswag engineering

Daniel Beckers

Efficient Production and Qualification of New Materials for the LPBF Process

A major issue for today's metal additive manufacturing industry is the low number of commercially available and qualified materials. This slows down the development of new applications and inhib-its the use AM in new industrial areas. To take on this problem Rosswag introduced a holistic pro-cess chain beginning with the powder production up to the final part qualification. This process chain is presented with a focus on powder production and the necessary subsequent material and process investigations to achieve predefined technical readiness levels. For the powder production, a typical production process is introduced and important powder and particle characteristics are discussed as well as how to transfer the as-sprayed powder into an LPBF-ready state. Afterwards, the material qualification route for the LPBF process together with target benchmark values for an initial qualification is shown.

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Daniel Mirbach
Head of Marketing
Oculavis/DE
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Head of Marketing
Oculavis/DE

Daniel Mirbach

Redefining Interactions with High-Temperature Furnaces and Equipment! Unlock AR Empowered Processes

Industrial service processes often require a lot of travelling to bring technical expertise to the place where it is needed. In addition, the Corona Virus makes personal contact with experts, technicians and machine operators on the shop floor more difficult. Modern Augmented Reality technology in combination with mobile devices and adapted to the processes of high-temperature furnace and equipment manufactures makes machine-relevant knowledge available anytime and anywhere. Less travel expenses, reduced downtimes, more efficient processes and the ability to establish digital business models for furnace manufacturers are long-term added values.

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Davide Sher
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Davide Sher

As a journalist and entrepreneur, with a great passion for the additive manufacturing industry and its potential to change the world for the better, I co-founded 3dpbm, a growing global agency, and resource for 3D printing-related businesses. We publish several editorial and news websites focusing on 3D printing/additive manufacturing.

Leveraging my previous experience as a senior analyst researching AM industry verticals, and an internally developed, unique forecast model, 3dpbm has now expanded into providing advanced market research products and services. We specialize on AM adoption in different market verti-cals, spanning from vertical AM applications (automotive, aerospace, medical, energy, tr anspor-tation, industrial tooling and automation) to specific AM industry verticals (materials and material families, hardware and technologies, software and services).

We also offer business development consultancy and communication services to both startups and established companies interested in implementing 3D printing services or adopting 3D print-ing technologies and applications. We organize webinars, events and participate in conferences worldwide focusing on 3D printing.

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Dr. Anke Kaletsch
Deputy Managing Director
IAPK
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Deputy Managing Director
IAPK

Dr. Anke Kaletsch

Accelerating the LPBF Process by the Combination of AM and HIP

Additive manufacturing (AM) processes are of great interest and are the subject of extensive re-search. Nevertheless, there are still limitations. For laser powder bed fusion (LPBF) the process duration for large components is long, and in addition, the reliability of manufactured components is often not sufficient due to manufacturing-related defects and an anisotropic microstructure. A popular way to optimize the mechanical properties is hot isostatic post-processing of additively manufactured components. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is an established method in powder metal-lurgy, which enables materials of the highest quality to be manufactured. The structure achieved is homogeneous and pore-free. Thus, additively manufactured components can be optimized enor-mously, in particular concerning their fatigue strength. Additionally, by using a HIP post-treatment, the AM process can be greatly accelerated by increasing the scanning speed or the hatch distance because HIP is able to densify large porosities if the samples are built with a dense shell.

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Dr. Gerald Mitteramskogler
Managing Director
Incus
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Managing Director
Incus

Dr. Gerald Mitteramskogler

Lithography-Based Metal Manufacturing (LMM)

Lithography-based Metal Manufacturing is an additive manufacturing technology for the production of functional metal components with superior surface aesthetics compared to other AM technologies. LMM is based on the concept of photopolymerization, where metal powder is homogeneously dispersed in a light-sensitive resin and selectively polymerized layer-by-layer by exposure with light. The printed green parts undergo a debinding step to burn off the photopolymer-based binder system. With a subsequent sintering step, mechanical properties, and microstructure equivalent to Metal Injection Molding (MIM) can be achieved. Sintered parts made of 316L stainless steel can achieve 98,5% of the relative density and a tensile strength > 500MPa.

The LMM approach enables production of complex part sizes < 200 g with low surface roughness, high accuracy of the details, mechanical properties, and feature resolution. LMM is developed as a complementary technology for the MIM mass production for prototyping and small-scale production. Using LMM, MIM producers can support their customers more efficiently in the prototyping phase and provide functional parts in hours instead of months.

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Dr.-Ing. J.C. Gruber
CREMER Thermoprozessanlagen GmbH
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CREMER Thermoprozessanlagen GmbH

Dr.-Ing. J.C. Gruber

Additive Manufacturing of Metals

The potential of innovative furnace technology for the development of hardmetal products for specific applications.

The wide spectrum of hardmetal applications is reflected by an equally large spectrum of grades differentiated according to chemical composition and microstructure. The required properties de-pend strongly on the application. The material characteristics must be tailored to fit these require-ments. Intense research is ongoing to increase the understanding of influence parameters on achievable properties and failure mechanisms in practice. In addition, the establishment of AM has opened up new possibilities concerning the versatility of hardmetal design options. To facilitate the production of new materials on an industrial scale, progress concerning furnace technology plays an important role. An overview of a selection of furnace technology currently in use along the pro-duction chain is considered. The application field of the CREMER CARBIDE2500 furnace type is car-burization of tungsten or tantalum on an industrial scale. This innovative technology has increased the possible carburizing temperature range to 1400°C–2500°C. The temperature and dwell time directly influence the grain size of the powder produced. A wide range of hardmetal hardness, frac-ture toughness, and wear resistance can be achieved by varying the grain size and binder content. An increase in grain size range available opens up new possibilities for material design.

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Dr. Johannes Pötschke
Group Leader Hardmetals and Cermet
Fraunhofer IKTS
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Group Leader Hardmetals and Cermet
Fraunhofer IKTS

Dr. Johannes Pötschke

Dr. Johannes Pötschke is group leader of the research group hardmetals and cermets at the Fraunhofer Institute IKTS in Dresden, Germany. He studied material science in Bayreuth and Dresden, Germany and did his PhD thesis on binderless hardmetals at the Technische Universität Dresden. He is in charge of many national as well as international public and industrial funded research projects in the field of hard materials development and processing, including additive manufacturing.

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Dipl.-Ing. Anne Vornberger
Scientist
Fraunhofer IKTS
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Scientist
Fraunhofer IKTS

Dipl.-Ing. Anne Vornberger

Hardmetals or cemented carbides are a widely used material for a wide range of applications such as cutting and drilling tools, mining tools and wear resistant parts. The excellent mechanical properties result from the combination of a ceramic hard phase, usually tungsten carbide (WC) and a ductile metallic binder phase, usually cobalt (Co). While this combination of WC and Co is most common since its initial development in the 1920s, there is an increasing need for both alternative hard phases and alternative binder phases. This is on the one hand due to increasing demands in regard to material performance and on the other hand due to the fact that Cobalt is classified as both a critical raw material and also as a toxic CMR material. This talk includes current research trends on novel compositions in regard to alternative hard phases and binder metals as well as on additive manufacturing technologies for complex shaped hardmetal tools.

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Dr. Jürgen Schmidt
Scientist
Extramet AG
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Scientist
Extramet AG

Dr. Jürgen Schmidt

100 Years of Hard Metals and not an End

Dr Margarethe Traxler, R&D Group Leader Material Development, Boehlerit GmbH & Co. KG

In 1923, almost 100 years ago, a material made of hard tungsten carbide and tough cobalt metal was patented, which laid the foundation for modern hard materials. From the beginning, further development was aimed at increasing material quality ("minimizing the defect density") and per-formance. Today, hard metal is a material on which both users and manufacturers place extremely high demands. Selected examples will be used to show how these can be met in the future. In an overview, aspects of the raw materials, the processing, the hard metal itself, and the life cycle will be addressed.

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Dr. Kai Sauerzapfe
Head of Business Unit Battery Systems
Alumina Systems/DE
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Head of Business Unit Battery Systems
Alumina Systems/DE

Dr. Kai Sauerzapfe

Highly Leak-tight Ceramic-metal Assembly for a Novel, Three-dimensional Im-aging X-ray Process

The presentation is intended to provide an overview of the ongoing bilateral 4-year development work by Adapter Imaging LTD and Alumina Systems GmbH in the context of the production of a new, three-dimensional imaging X-ray process. The main focus of the work presented here is the evolution of the vacuum-tight brazed ceramic-metal component to generate the required X-ray radiation. In this case, the ceramic-metal brazed part is one of the core components for the patented process.
Selected evolutionary steps (from the first idea to the implemented solution) and the corresponding joining technology will be presented and discussed. Advantages and disadvantages concerning the required production steps will be presented, including the design decisions derived from them.
Finally, the advantages of the novel process are presented showing first examples from tests conducted by Adaptix Imaging LTD.

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Dr. Patrick Gehre
Senior Researcher
TU Freiberg, Freiberg/DE
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Senior Researcher
TU Freiberg, Freiberg/DE

Dr. Patrick Gehre

New Approaches of AM of Dense and Porous Ceramics for Advanced Refractory Applications

Additive manufacturing enables the production of specially designed foams, grids, and bulk structures for customized applications. The combination of additively manufactured sacrificial templates with flame-spray technique enables the production of ceramics for high-temperature applications with excellent thermal shock resistance and chemical inertness, such as ceramic filters for molten metal filtration and casting moulds. Water-soluble templates based on hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and manufactured by selective laser sintering (SLS) were covered by an alumina flame-spray coating, which acts as standalone ceramic object after removing the organic template. The resulting microstructure and phase composition were analysed and the interaction of the products with molten metal evaluated.

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Dr. Simona Illiescu
R&D Manager
Sedal/ES
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R&D Manager
Sedal/ES

Dr. Simona Illiescu

Water-Based Tape Casting Process: an Innovative Environmental

Friendly Process for Mass Production of Thick and Thin Ceramic Substrates for Electronic Applications

Towards the commitment to the environment by introducing a cleaner process with-in the mass production, Sedal has been involved for the last years in the optimization of the water-based tape casting process to produce high quality ceramic substrates for electronic applications. It is well known that water-based tape casting is a low- cost and especially an environmentally friendly process. But its main difficulty relies on the drying conditions and controlling the thickness of the tapes obtained, among others. That is why, its mass production introduction is being a difficult task for the ceramic substrate´s industry and is the main reason for which the organic solvent-based tape casting process predominates, even its complex installations, high cost and harmful effect for the environment.

Despite this, Sedal has optimized the water-based process for different thicknesses of alumina 96 substrates for mass production: from 0,3 mm to 1mm. Slurry formulation, tape casting process conditions, densification and post sintering processes, all have influence on the final quality of the substrate, but also are conditioning the continuity of the process. Using the optimized process, Sedal can produce high quality ceramic substrates that accomplish state of the art standards required by electronic applications. Physical, mechanical, electrical, thermal and surface properties are showing that this process can be used industrially in continuous production, gaining a cleaner process without losing performance of the substrates. Some results of our ceramic substrates obtained in the mass production by water-based tape casting process are shown in this paper.

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Dr. Tassilo Mortiz
Senior Researcher
Fraunhofer IKTS
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Senior Researcher
Fraunhofer IKTS

Dr. Tassilo Mortiz

Scene Additive—Together to a Productive Level of Ceramic Additive Manufacturing

The Scene Additive in the DKG (German Ceramic Society) has been founded as an open platform and sees itself as a service, technical, and lobbying point for the additive manufacturing of ceramics. The contribution takes a look back at the activities of the scene in the past. However, times are changing and the technology hype of Additive Manufacturing is already behind us. Now, we are faced with the slope of enlightenment for reaching the level of productivity in this technological area. The scene would like to tackle these new challenges and offers those who are interested in and using additive manufacturing a platform for exchanging experiences, further technological development and better representation of the interests of its members. After intensive discussion of the board members with industry representatives of companies which are already using Additive Manufacturing for ceramic components production or which are on the jump to do so, the Scene Additive intents to transform into the structure of a committed association offering its members unity for solution of upcoming technical tasks. The contribution shall act as initiator for a subsequent discussion about the contents of future work, about the frame of collaboration, and about the goals to be defined for the very next steps.

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Dr. Ulrich Degenhardt
Head of R&D
FCT Ingenieurkeramik/DE
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Head of R&D
FCT Ingenieurkeramik/DE

Dr. Ulrich Degenhardt

Silicon Nitride Speciality Materials for Product and Process Innovation in Semiconductor and Analysis Technology

Many areas of technology would be unthinkable today without high-performance ceramics on the basis of silicon nitride for the optimization of structures and processes. They are used, for instance, for reducing wear, increasing process temperatures, avoiding corrosion or cross-contamination to lightweight engineering or reducing accelerated masses.

In many new applications, however, the established standard silicon nitride grades available on the market are now reaching their limits. One solution may be speciality grades with a properties profile that has been selectively changed based on modification of the composition and/or microstructure compared to established gas-pressure-sintered silicon nitride (GPSN). On account of the high technological challenges involved, however, such special variations developed in laboratories in recent decades are only slowly finding their way into production.

As a specialist in silicon-nitride-based materials and niche supplier, FCT Ingenieurkeramik recognized the sign of the times early on and has therefore been offering speciality Si3N4 material variants for several years now. The technological benefit can be shown very clearly with the example of semi-conductor technology: For example, for the lining of coating equipment or handling systems for wafers, speciality ceramics are sought that contain the lowest possible quantities of sintering additives and impurities in their composition in order to minimize the effects of cross-contamination. In other cases, a thermal expansion coefficient identical to that of the silicon or SiC wafers is required to structure semi-conductors as finely and precisely as possible and then test them accordingly. For the perfect tempering of wafers, on the other hand, speciality Si3N4 grades with increased thermal conductivity are useful. These are also used increasingly as substrates for high-power circuits—e. g. in wind power and electric mobility applications, as, besides good heat dissipation, higher application temperatures, thermal shock resistance and strength or damage tolerance are becoming increasingly important for these components.

For measurement and analysis systems, tailored Si3N4 ceramics offer crucial advantages: for example, crucible holders in smelters for XRF specimens—made of Hastelloy up to now—are now being replaced with a special Si3N4 grade. Thanks to high-temperature strength and corrosion resistance, the ceramic solution offers not only a longer lifetime, it also reduces cross-contamination in XRF analysis specimens.

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Elisabeth To
NanoE/FR
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NanoE/FR

Elisabeth To

Ceramics and Metal AM by FFF Process and Use-cases

Due to the price of molds and the constraints of casting, technical ceramic parts are costly and complicated to produce by regular processes, in particular for small series or on demand parts. Companies and labs have to make compromises between the choice of the material and the price, sometimes giving up ceramic for a less suitable but more affordable material.

Zetamix filaments enable companies to solve these issues and to produce parts in the most suitable material for the application. Zetamix range offers 3 ceramic filaments—alumina, zirconia, and black zirconia—and two metal filaments—H13 steel and 316L stainless steel -. They are all compatible with almost every FFF printers, and make it possible to cut down investment cost of ceramic and metal 3D printing implementation. Inspired by ceramic powder injection process, the Zetamix manufacturing process consists of three stages: printing, debinding and sintering. With a density of over 99 %, the finished product benefits the same properties as its counterparts made with traditional methods.This technology is used in a wide range of fields: aerospace, foundry, luxury industry, automotive but also labs and research centers. Possibilities of applications are endless: Zetamix range is relevant to produce on demand parts, complex parts, prototypes but also tools.  From the production of aeronautic probes to sample holder, Zetamix filaments solve many production issues.

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Frank Händle
Consultant
ETC-KEMA/DE
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Consultant
ETC-KEMA/DE

Frank Händle

Ceramic Filters for Advanced Process Technologies

Due to their specific advantages, the demand for ceramic filters is increasing worldwide. As a consequence of the rapid spread and development, the quantitative and qualitative requirements for the

demands on the extrusion of these filters as the dominating shaping method are growing in concept and detail.

Which requirements have to be met in extrusion?

Which perspectives and drivers are to be expected?

Are there new developments in the geometry or the coating of the filters?

All this will be explained in a practice-oriented way by

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Frank Veitengruber
M. Sc.
Forschungsgesellschaft für Energiewirtschaft mbH/DE
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M. Sc.
Forschungsgesellschaft für Energiewirtschaft mbH/DE

Frank Veitengruber

Energy Efficiency in Practice

Companies are facing major challenges in the course of the energy transition. In the future, in addition to the pure increase in energy efficiency, especially the reduction of CO2 emissions will become even more important and both key figures and company targets will be aligned with this. In order to successfully achieve the climate policy goals for reducing emissions in the entire sector, companies therefore need an energy or decarbonization strategy that is fit for the future and with which they can master the upcoming challenges. Following the proven structure of energy efficiency networks, which focus on increasing energy efficiency, decarbonization networks such as dekarbN, also connect companies to each other to take advantage of the time and cost-saving benefits of working together to develop their decarbonization strategy. A parallel workshop series presents targeted methods and measures that are important for developing a decarbonization strategy and facilitates the transfer of research into practice.

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Gerhard Seifert
Senior Researcher
Fraunhofer-Center for High Temperature Materials and Design HTL, Bayreuth/DE
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Senior Researcher
Fraunhofer-Center for High Temperature Materials and Design HTL, Bayreuth/DE

Gerhard Seifert

The worldwide demand for minimizing greenhouse gas emissions causes a continually increasing need for energy-efficient and flexible operation of large industrial kilns. In spite of the apparent challenges of getting reliable sensor data on the furnace performance under harsh conditions like temperatures above 1000°C and aggressive turbulent combustion gases, digital representation and control of high temperature processes and facilities has a large potential for efficient furnace operation. In particular, flexibility against fluctuating supply of regenerative energy sources requires reliable predictions of the behavior of the fired (ceramic) material in dependence of the processing parameters. A digital furnace twin is a combination of such models comprising combustion, heat transfer and material flow in the furnace as well as the process-related material changes under thermal treatment. Such a twin can either be designed for automated real-time control of furnace operation or for a completely digital, model-based construction of new kiln systems. In this talk, the current state of research in this field will be reported.

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Hartmut Weber
Vice President Sales
CREMER Thermoprozessanlagen GmbH/DE
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Vice President Sales
CREMER Thermoprozessanlagen GmbH/DE

Hartmut Weber

Using Hydrogen in Ceramic Industry Kilns—H2 Hybrid Kilns Gaining Ground?

Hydrogen is of huge importance for the success of the energy transition. After all, hydrogen promises that everything can stay the way it is. Fossil fuels are replaced by hydrogen that is generated with renewable power. This vision is also very tempting for the fuel-intensive ceramics industry with its kilns, in order for it to become CO2 emission-free. The current potential applications for hydrogen as fuel in kiln engineering as well as the current technical limitations are presented. Besides the corresponding burner technology, the paper also addresses the novel heating concepts resulting from this. Moreover, the paper aims to provide thought-provoking impulses with regard to the question: Will today’s kilns be H2 hybrid kilns in the future?

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Heinz-Jürgen Blüm
Managing Director
MUT Advanced Heating GmbH/DE
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Managing Director
MUT Advanced Heating GmbH/DE

Heinz-Jürgen Blüm

Debinding and Sintering under Advanced Atmospheres

Debinding and Sintering is one of the key steps in powder-based manufacturing. Especially in powder metallurgy, when processing reactive metals, clean and controlled atmospheres are key to get as little impurities as possible and to meet highest material properties. To achieve this it is necessary to understand the chemical and physical processes happening during debinding and the thermodynamics of sintering. This will be discussed in general as well as for stainless steel and titanium as these two materials are of big interest and used a lot in additive manufacturing. Furthermore the ISO furnace concept will be explained which combines debinding and sintering in one furnace to reduce the pick-up of impurities and shorten the process time. The quality that can be achieved with this system will be illustrated by some examples.

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Herbert Gröbl
Competence Team IoT
DORST Technologies/DE
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Competence Team IoT
DORST Technologies/DE

Herbert Gröbl

The Next Challenge in Digital Production with Powder Metal Presses

Since several years Dorst Technologies offers IoT functions that extract valuable data from the production process for the user of hydraulic and electric powder presses, refine them and make them available in the customer's own MES system, ready to use. Various satisfied customers are already successfully using the system in production.

The objectives are:

1. Part Quality - documentation of ongoing production by recording and consistently storing all relevant press parameters.

2. Productivity Overview - daily, weekly and long-term production overview, machine availability documentation

3. Machine Condition - monitoring of all relevant machine elements. Smart Maintenance, the innovative service, includes automated monitoring and predictive maintenance for presses.

In addition to the presentation of the IoT function packages and their topology in the production environment, the presentation will address the revolutionary opportunities opened up by the systematic application of artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms and machine learning in the context of part quality and machine availability.

In order to meet the diverse demands of digital services, Dorst has developed a modular IoT function library. An individual data model will be created based on the customer's requirements. The Dorst IoT system easily connects to higher-level enterprise systems through optimally adapted interfaces. The refined data are made available to the customer's MES system via this interface.

In addition to data refining, Dorst Analytics, - a SaS (Software as a Service) solution, offers advanced data analytics functions for Dorst customers in case of complex problems and questions in the production environment.

In addition to its competence in data analytics, Dorst Technologies is mainly a valuable partner for successful digital production thanks to its technological and machine-specific know-how.

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Holger Friedrich
Senior Researcher
Fraunhofer-Center for High Temperature Materials and Design HTL /DE
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Senior Researcher
Fraunhofer-Center for High Temperature Materials and Design HTL /DE

Holger Friedrich

Debinding and Sintering Optimization via Apps

Debinding and sintering are critical steps in ceramic processing with respect to time, cost and quality.

For a sophisticated optimization, more quantities than weight loss and shrinkage over temperature have to be evaluated. These encompass thermal diffusivity, gas permeability, reaction products and strength, viscous parameters as well as heat transfer from the oven. Hereby, all of these properties do depend on the degree of debinding / sintering and temperature.

Finite element models have been developed, which allow an accurate prediction of material response to a heating process based on measured data. Once a type of green samples has been characterized different components can be simulated. For that, HTL has developed apps, which calculate optimized heating cycles for flexible geometries and oven settings for a given, well-characterized material. The apps are run directly by the user, providing flexibility, fastening the development process and solving issues of confidentiality.

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Rabea Naemi Cegla
Researcher
Steuler KCH/DE
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Researcher
Steuler KCH/DE

Rabea Naemi Cegla

Reaction Bonding of Mullite-based Ceramics

The production of ceramics based on mullite, require high temperatures up to 1750°C, in order that a heat or creep resistant product will reach the relevant prod-uct parametersPreviously work in our group was focused on lowering the temperature of sintering mullite based ceramics, by using silicon (Si) - and aluminium metal (AL) powders, as sintering partners, to generate a reaction bonding process that produces fully reacted materials, which will not re- react with further heat treatments, including heat treatments over the initial sintering temperature.

This paper describes how it was possible, by the use of silicon metal and aluminium hydroxide, to produce mullite based ceramics with enhanced properties.

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Joachim Vogt
Researcher
Fraunhofer-Center for High Temperature Materials and Design HTL/DE
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Researcher
Fraunhofer-Center for High Temperature Materials and Design HTL/DE

Joachim Vogt

A Cost-efficient Direct Foaming Technique for Ceramic Foams Based on Renewable Raw Materials

Highly porous ceramics, also referred to as ceramic foams, combine the high rigidity, hardness and thermal stability of ceramics with typical properties of highly porous structures like very low density, low thermal conductivity, high specific surface and high permeability. Therefore, they offer high potential in various applications like e. g. high-temperature insulation, metal filtration, catalysis, lightweight structures, refractories and bone replacement.

Direct foaming techniques are a very cost- and resource-efficient way to prepare ceramic foams. At the Fraunhofer-Center HTL, a highly flexible direct foaming technique has been developed which aims for minimal production cost and carbon footprint. For this purpose, renewable raw materials are used for stabilizing mechanically frothed ceramic slurries. Aiming at an application in high temperature insulation > 1400 °C, open porosities up to 85 vol.-% and a thermal conductivity down to 0,5 W/mK could be achieved. Beside thermal insulation, other applications are also discussed.

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Jonathan Maier
Fraunhofer-Center for High Temperature Materials and Design HTL /DE
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Fraunhofer-Center for High Temperature Materials and Design HTL /DE

Jonathan Maier

Ceramic Coatings for High-temperature Applications

A wide range of ceramic coatings for high-temperature applications is being developed at Fraunhofer ISC/Center HTL. These include environmental barrier coatings, fiber coatings, wear and corrosion-resistant coatings for furnace materials and others. The coatings are produced primarily via wet-chemical coating processes and slurry deposition processes. Various material systems can be used for the coatings, e. g. Al2O3, Al2O3-SiO2, SiO2, rare earth silicates, yttrium aluminum garnet, ZrO2, zirconium titanates, TiO2, SiC, BN or SiBNC. The institute's material and coating process development will be presented in relation to the state of the art.

Of particular interest are the Environmental Barrier Coatings, in short EBCs, which are used as protective coatings at high temperatures in corrosive atmospheres. These EBCs are used for the protection of oxide and non-oxide ceramic matrix composites in aerospace and power generation applications. To minimize thermal stresses due to different thermal expansion coefficients, the EBCs are designed as multilayer systems.

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Markus Lindner
Design Manager
Lippert GmbH & Co KG/DE
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Design Manager
Lippert GmbH & Co KG/DE

Markus Lindner

The Challenge of Drying Technical Ceramics

The drying of technical ceramics is a challenge for the manufacturers of drying systems, as a very wide range of ceramic materials is used here. Due to the countless geometric shapes, a wide variety of manufacturing processes are used, which in turn have a significant influence on the drying of the components. When using appropriate auxiliaries in the ceramics or in the manufacturing process, an after-treatment of the exhaust air from these drying systems is necessary.

The combination of material diversity and geometries, some of which sound out the physical limit of ceramics, requires drying solutions that are designed in such a way that good process control of the drying process is made possible. Economic and efficient drying can only take place if the process parameters specified by the ceramic materials and the design of the components are adhered to.

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Apl.-Prof. Dr Martin Bram
Team Leader
Forschungszentrum Jülich/DE
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Team Leader
Forschungszentrum Jülich/DE

Apl.-Prof. Dr Martin Bram

Application of Electric Current Assisted Sintering

Techniques for Advanced Processing of Energy Materials

At Forschungszentrum Jülich, the Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-1: Materials Synthesis and Processing) has long-term expertise in the field of Electric Current Assisted Sintering (ECAS) techniques. IEK-1 operates a broad spectrum of related equipment including Field Assisted Sintering Technology/Spark Plasma Sintering (FAST/SPS), Hybrid FAST/SPS with additional heater, Ultra-fast High Temperature Sintering (UHS), Flash SPS, Flash Sintering (FS) and Sinter Forging (SF). Current research topics—ranging from fundamental to applied research—are discussed on selected examples.

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Matteo Tellarini
Data Analyst
SACMI Innovation Lab, SACMI/IT
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Data Analyst
SACMI Innovation Lab, SACMI/IT

Matteo Tellarini

Data-centric Smart Factory

Since the breakthrough of deep neural networks in image recognition, artificial intelligence has proven to be very successful in a wide range of industrial applications, bringing the concept of automation to a new level.

However, a full deployment of these technologies in a plant poses serious challenges.

In order to let the algorithms support the decision-making process of white and blue collars in a reliable way, one need to standardize the flux of data generated across the entire factory, from raw materials characterization to quality controls, from scheduling orders to warehouse management.

That is the key to unlock the power of AI under the strict constraints imposed in a production environment.

In other words, we really need to acknowledge the central role played by data to make a factory smarter, as tech companies did to create the smart devices that changed our way of living.

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Prof. Dr. Alexander Michaelis
Institute Director
Fraunhofer IKTS
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Institute Director
Fraunhofer IKTS

Prof. Dr. Alexander Michaelis

Task Force Hydrogen: Hydrogen for and with Ceramics—a Common Initiative of the Federal Association of the German Ceramics Industry (BVKI) and the German Ceramic Society (DKG)

The ceramics production process has severe energy demands due to the required high temperature processes such as debinding and sintering. In order to lower the associated CO2 footprints, new technologies have to be evaluated. The use of hydrogen—but also power based or oxyfuel processes offer promising solutions for ecological and economic process schemes.

Moreover, due to the unique material properties ceramic products play an essential role for the development of system solutions for the envisioned future hydrogen economy. Hydrogen cannot be efficiently produced without the use of ceramic materials. Examples such as ceramic based electrolysis (SOEC: solid oxide electrolysis cell) for H2 production or sensor technology for harsh environments will be discussed.

It can be concluded: There will be no hydrogen economy without ceramics industry.

Initiated by DKG and BVKI these aspects will be further substantiated in a white paper to advice the public authorities. Furthermore, a “hydrogen task force” of industrial and academic partner will be implemented to facilitate joint R&D projects.

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Univ.-Prof. Dr. Raul Bermejo
Professor of Materials Science and Chair of Structural and Functional Ceramics
Montanuniversitaet Leoben
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Professor of Materials Science and Chair of Structural and Functional Ceramics
Montanuniversitaet Leoben

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Raul Bermejo

Professional career (year, function, company, place):

Since 2019 Professor at the Department of Materials Science at the Montanuniversität Leoben, in Austria.

Since 2018 Adjunct Faculty at the Materials Science and Engineering Department at The Pennsylvania State University.

Education

MSc in Degree of Mechanical Engineering in 2002

PhD Materials Science in 2006

Habilitation: Structural and Functional Ceramics in 2015

Professional memberships / Special activities:

Member of Austrian, European, and American Ceramic Society

Associate editor of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society

Working fields:

(i) Additive manufacturing of ceramics with tailored microstructure

(ii) Mechanical reliability of structural and functional ceramics

(iii) Bio-inspired layered architectures for tough and reliable ceramic components

(iv) Mechanical testing, fracture mechanics, failure analyses

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Rainer Gaebel
RefratechnikHolding /DE
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RefratechnikHolding /DE

Rainer Gaebel

New Refractory Materials and Concepts for the Reduction of CO2 Emissions of High-Temperature Processes

Reducing or minimizing the carbon footprint of industrial processes is one of the essential tasks of the current decade. In order to reach the global goals of reducing the greenhouse gas emissions significantly, the energy efficiency of high-temperature processes has to be improved. Such energy consuming process steps are the essential basis for the production of many raw materials and primary products. At operating temperatures of >1400 °C or even >1600 °C a controlled heat management is crucial. Hence, refractory products have to fulfill several tasks. On the hot face, the refractory material has to withstand the high temperature and corrosive media whereas towards the cold face it shall offer a low thermal conductivity. For many high-temperature processes, a layered structure consisting of different refractory materials is the current standard.

Several new approaches of improved and carbon footprint optimized refractory products are discussed. Several examples of refractory concepts for a direct CO2-saving are given for several industries e.g. steel, cement and ceramic industry.

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Raphael Kunz
Sales Engineer
Ceramic Membrane Discs, Kerafol/DE
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Sales Engineer
Ceramic Membrane Discs, Kerafol/DE

Raphael Kunz

Tailoring Natural Fertilizer

The situation is coming to a head. Agriculture is blamed for being the sole culprit for too high nitrate concentrations in the ground water. Farmers are asked to reduce the spreading of manure and digestate, accepting the loss of earning. Of course, this leads to protests from the agricultural sector. The origin of this issue is, that manure and digestate contain too less essential phosphate or too much ammonium, respectively, to sufficiently supply the highly bred crops with nutrients. To provide the plants with ideal growing conditions, either phosphate can be added (Morocco and China are the only countries with noteworthy deposits) or the volume of the untreated natural fertilizers is adjusted to the phosphate need (which leads to the nitration of unused ammonium).

A well-working solution to the dilemma is to separate the raw material into different fractions by ultrafiltration. The possibility results from the comparatively large size of phosphate ions. This process should of course be ideally run continuously, at low energy consumption and in high yield (heavily concentrated). Dynamic crossflow filtration is a separation technique that fulfills all these requirements. Disc-shaped membranes are assembled onto a hollow shaft which is rotated by a motor. The transmembrane pressure generated in a pressurized housing. The filtrate passes the membrane from the outside to the inside and is removed through the shaft, while the retentate is constantly removed from the membrane surface and re-dispersed. Continuous cleaning through tangentially flow (“crossflow effect”) is thus not reached by pumps like in conventional setups (moving liquid, static membrane), but by the rotation of the filter stack (moving membrane, static liquid). This ensures significant energy savings during operation. Beyond that, the values transmembrane pressure and cross flow velocity are preserved as individual parameters. This allows both the cleaning effect to be increased many times over (higher flux) and the processing of high concentrations (savings in volume of the tailored material). The filtration using KERAFOL’s alumina membrane disc with 5 nm coating leads to a phosphorous-enriched fraction, while a subsequent reverse osmosis gives a potassium- and nitrogen-rich concentrate as well as pure demineralized water. All in all, this procedure can reduce the nitrogen content in natural fertilizers as well as significantly save volume for storage and transport.

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René Kirchner
Head of Sales
FCT Systeme GmbH/DE
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Head of Sales
FCT Systeme GmbH/DE

René Kirchner

3D-Screen Printing of Solar Absorbers Made of SiSiC, Sintered in an Efficient High-Performance Furnace

Exentis Group AG, as the inventor of Exentis 3D Mass Customization, an innovative manufacturing technology of industrial 3D screen printing, can produce the finest ceramic structures by layer-wise build-up. By changing the screen with different structures, complex and at the same time fine geometries are possible, such as the 3-way stepped solar absorber with spikes, which in the finest structure has a web width of 450 µm (as green body). But also more delicate structures such as walls with a thickness with a minimum of 100 µm can be realized with this technology. A variety of metals, polymers and ceramics can be processed due to the adaptability of the developed paste recipes for this process. The aforementioned solar absorber which can be made of SSiC or SiSiC is sintered at FCT Systeme GmbH.

FCT Systeme is a producer of innovative high temperature furnaces for sintering predominantly non-oxide materials. Together with our partner, Exentis Group AG we developed efficient sintering methods which are designed especially for filigree, fine-structured parts. Besides the optimized combined process (de-binding and sintering in one furnace) we also integrated a fast-cooling system in order to guarantee an economic production of the parts. In the framework of this project it has succeeded, to provide solar absorber with finest structures via an innovative forming process combined with an efficient sintering process to the market in an economic way.

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Lisa Birkigt
Project Manager
Exentis Technology/CH
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Project Manager
Exentis Technology/CH

Lisa Birkigt

3D-Screen Printing of Solar Absorbers Made of SiSiC, Sintered in an Efficient High-Performance Furnace

Exentis Group AG, as the inventor of Exentis 3D Mass Customization, an innovative manufacturing technology of industrial 3D screen printing, can produce the finest ceramic structures by layer-wise build-up. By changing the screen with different structures, complex and at the same time fine geometries are possible, such as the 3-way stepped solar absorber with spikes, which in the finest structure has a web width of 450 µm (as green body). But also more delicate structures such as walls with a thickness with a minimum of 100 µm can be realized with this technology. A variety of metals, polymers and ceramics can be processed due to the adaptability of the developed paste recipes for this process. The aforementioned solar absorber which can be made of SSiC or SiSiC is sintered at FCT Systeme GmbH.

FCT Systeme is a producer of innovative high temperature furnaces for sintering predominantly non-oxide materials. Together with our partner, Exentis Group AG we developed efficient sintering methods which are designed especially for filigree, fine-structured parts. Besides the optimized combined process (de-binding and sintering in one furnace) we also integrated a fast-cooling system in order to guarantee an economic production of the parts. In the framework of this project it has succeeded, to provide solar absorber with finest structures via an innovative forming process combined with an efficient sintering process to the market in an economic way.

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Richard Gaignon
CEO
3DCERAM Sinto/FR
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CEO
3DCERAM Sinto/FR

Richard Gaignon

Ceramic AM for New Space

3D Printing is a technology which remains associated with prototyping and spare parts for the majority of industry. However, early adopters from markets such as, aerospace or biomedical, rapidly understood how to use to their advantage and jumped, from the very beginning, on the opportunity to actively participate in its development. They could see the capabilities to produce parts not possible with traditional processes, with new designs to enhance parts and add new functionalities to obtain better performances. Above all, 3D Printing works with different materials including technical ceramics! For over 15 years, at 3DCeram, experts have been working to perfect the prototype and material qualification stage. Now it arrived at the production stage, the so-called mass customization. Is it reliable now? The answer arises from 2 case-studies coming from the spatial industry. The first one concerns a new-space industrial nanosatellites builder, the second is a company that designs and manufactures spacecraft thrusters for nanosatellites.

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Sascha Galic
Sales Director
J. Rettenmaier&Söhne
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Sales Director
J. Rettenmaier&Söhne

Sascha Galic

Plant-based Hydrocolloids and Biopolymers—Bio-based Solutions for Ceramic AM?

Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (HPMC)

Aqueous systems of this cellulose ether can increase the viscosity and form gels upon heating. A special property is the reversibility of this thermal gelation. HPMC is mainly defined by the degree of substitutions (DS) and the viscosity. Thereby thickening of mixtures can be regulated and different gelling points can be achieved.

Alginate

A natural hydrocolloid extracted from brown algae. They differ in their capacity to react with calcium ions and other di- or trivalent ions. By this reaction the rheology changes and the state of aggregation changes from liquid to solid. Therefore, water insoluble, temperature stable gels and films can be produced.

Microcrystalline Cellulose Gel (MCG)

MCG is a gel forming agent which is co-processed from MCC and a water-soluble thickener such as e. g. CMC or xanthan. The thickener in combination with the MCC ensures an easy dispersibility and prevents the re-aggregation of the MCC particles in water. To activate the MCG and form a gel, high shear mixing is necessary. After activation in water, MCG forms a 3-D elastic gel-network of insoluble cellulose fibrils.

Pectins

Pectin is a versatile biopolymer which is found in the cell walls of fruits, especially citrus fruits and apples. Pectins are complex polysaccharides that chemically consists of partial methyl esters of polygalacturonic acid and their salts (sodium, potassium, calcium and ammonia).

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Torsten Seidel
Managing Director
ETC-Kema, Schöpstal/DE
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Managing Director
ETC-Kema, Schöpstal/DE

Torsten Seidel

AM by Extrusion of Ceramics

In contrast to the established AM processes in which the material is applied in the form of discrete point-like volumes, the AMbE process is characterized by the continuous application of columns of ceramic and related materials. Depending on the component, the columns can be extruded with different cross-sections at variable extrusion rates.

A differentiation is made here between “cold” extrusion with and without subsequent hydraulic setting, as opposed to thermoplastic AMbE extrusion with subsequent hardening or sintering.

The advantages and disadvantages of the AMbE process developed by ECT-KEMA as well as the possibilities are illustrated with reference to examples.

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Ulrich Werr
Area Sales Manager
Rauschert/DE
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Area Sales Manager
Rauschert/DE

Ulrich Werr

Advanced Ceramics for Healthcare—Materials, Properties, Applications

The most important properties of advanced ceramics in the field of medical technology are hardness, electrical insulation, stiffness and, of course, biocompatibility. Ceramics are therefore indispensable in this field; they play a decisive role in many areas, including implants, dental prostheses and medical instruments.

In this lecture, the most common ceramic materials for applications in surgical instruments, their specific properties and typical areas of use in this application will be shown. In addition to solid ceramics, ceramic coatings will be presented, which are also suitable for such applications and in some cases can represent an interesting alternative.

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Uwe Scheithauer
Researcher
Fraunhofer Institute of Ceramic Technologies and Systems, Dresden/DE
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Researcher
Fraunhofer Institute of Ceramic Technologies and Systems, Dresden/DE

Uwe Scheithauer

CerAMfacturing of Ceramic-based Multi Material Components

Additive manufacturing (AM) is on everyone's lips, as previously unknown possibilities arise in the field of shaping. However, AM processes also have their limitations in terms of design freedom and still have some catching up to do compared to conventional processes in terms of realizable component properties and manufacturing costs.

By adapting AM to the manufacturing of multi-material components, the component properties can be further increased, so that advanced ceramic components with previously unattainable properties and property combinations can be realized.

The presentation will summarize our current status for two different manufacturing strategies. With simultaneous manufacturing, thermal co-processing of the different materials is necessary, while this can be avoided with sequential manufacturing. However, the geometric freedom in simultaneous manufacturing is much higher than in sequential manufacturing, but the choice of material combinations that can be processed is much smaller.

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Walter Pritzkow
CEO
Walter E.C. Pritzkow Spezialkeramik/DE
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CEO
Walter E.C. Pritzkow Spezialkeramik/DE

Walter Pritzkow

Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites—Replacement Possibility for Metallic Alloys at High Temperatures

When working on high temperature applications, mechanical engineers are used to think in metals and high temperature alloys. Working at temperatures higher than 600°C with metals, it is seen that the material reduces their strength dramatically. In addition it can be seen that due to the high thermal expansion of metals on structures permanent deformations or stress induced cracks occur. Also high temperature corrosion will be seen.

Can be a high temperature fiber reinforced composite material an alternative? With Oxide/Oxide Ceramic Matrix Composites (Ox/Ox-CMC) a material is developed that combines the positive properties of metals like damage tolerance and the high temperature performance of ceramic. Looking at the high temperature strength it is seen that above 800°C Ox/Ox-CMC has better values than metals. Regarding the specific tensile strength at temperatures lower than 600°C Ox/Ox-CMCs have the same values than metals, above 600°C they are much better.

Due to that with Ox/Ox-CMC thin-walled ceramic structures can be produced, this ceramic material can replace perfectly thin-walled sheet metal structure. The much lower density of Ox/Ox-CMC gives the possibility to produce light weight structure. In this presentation several high temperature applications were shown with a better life time and a much better performance than metal parts. These are applications in the field of aeronautics, careers for heat treatment, chemical engineering and in special for high temperature Solar receivers for central receiver systems.

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Wolfgang Heining
Project Manager
Lippert GmbH & Co KG/DE
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Project Manager
Lippert GmbH & Co KG/DE

Wolfgang Heining

Transformation from Manufactory to Smart Production

Whether from the consumer side or from industrial customers—the expectations of the products are changing. In the days of manufactories it was still enough for them to be of high quality and individual, at the time of industrialization it was above all quality, price and availability. Many people wanted access to goods that were previously inaccessible to them. In the course of time, individuality was added, which one tried to achieve by means of a variety of variants. This is no longer enough. The essential new requirements from the market are real individuality, more customer benefits in existing products and more services. This requirement also affects production. Smart Production wants to meet these new requirements for production systems based on new customer needs and the corresponding business models using innovative technologies and methods. That’s the theory. But how does this work in practice?

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